Personal Finance Tips That Money Can’t Buy

Personal finance is not something that all people understand. Living in an age where credit is easy come, easy go, does not help the situation. Learn how to budget and take control of your personal finances and life will become less stressful when you learn that you can live within your means.

When you are renting out your property there may come a time that you need to have a tenant evicted. It is a hard decision to make, and it doesn’t come cheap either. You can easily go through the process yourself, no lawyer is needed, but be sure to seek out the advice of someone else who has done it before, as the court system can be tough to navigate for the first time on your own.

Have a plan for dealing with collection agencies and follow it. Do not engage in a war of words with a collection agent. Simply ask them to send you written information regarding your bill and you will research it and get back to them. Research the statue of limitations in your state for collections. You may be getting pushed to pay something you are no longer liable for.

In order to keep track of your personal finances, use a smart phone based app or a calendar warning, on your computer or phone, to tell you when bills are due. You should set goals for how much you want to have spent by a particular date in the month. This works because it’s an easy reminder and you don’t even need to think about it, once you’ve set it up.

To save on college costs, strongly consider enrollment at a local community college for the first two years and then transfer to a four-year institution for your last two years. With annual tuition cost savings of 50% or more over traditional four-year universities, going to a community college for your first two years can make a whole lot of sense. Many community colleges have direct transfer programs to four-year institutions that ensure the relevance of the credits you have earned towards your degree. You will get the exact same diploma and credentials at the end of the four years, as your classmates who attended the four-year university straight-through, but your costs (and possible debt) will be so much less.

After you’ve developed a clear cut budget, then develop a savings plan. Say you spend 75% of your income on bills, leaving 25%. With that 25%, determine what percentage you will save and what percentage will be your fun money. In this way, over time, you will develop a savings.

If you live near a group of employees that you work with, form a carpool. This will allow you to save money on gas, reducing one of your expenses dramatically over the year. Carpooling is not only fun, but a great way to implement as a money management tool for the year’s expenses.

When you are taking out money, one thing that you must try to avoid is withdrawing from a different bank than your own. Each withdrawal will cost you between 2 to 4 dollars and can add up over time. Stick to the bank of your choice if you want to minimize your miscellaneous expenses.

You should have a savings account set up in case of emergencies. Save for some goal that you want to achieve, such as paying off a debt or saving up enough money to go to college.

Get yourself an emergency savings account. Stuff happens and you need to be prepared. An internet account won’t do because you’ll need as immediate an access as possible, so find the nearest local bank that has terms that you can live with. Have a portion of your pay, or from even your checking, be automatically deposited into this savings account.

If you want to perfectly manage your personal finances one of the simple things that you need to take into account are opportunity costs. There are things that you might not be paying for directly, but giving up the chance to make money is a cost to it in itself.

Set a financial goal to work your way toward financial security. Your goal can be small initially, such as paying off one credit card. Later, you can grow that goal to something like being a millionaire by retirement age. Setting a goal gives you something to work toward. It also allows you to outline specific steps that you will follow in order to get there. Both are important steps toward improving your financial situation.

If you are considering getting any type of credit card, make sure that you consider a rewards card. Since we’re talking about your personal finances here, there might as well be something in it for you personally since you’re going to go the credit route. Rewards can include airline miles, cash back, or other rewards.

Take a second look at dealer financing with a very low APR. While it may seem like a good idea to save on interest charges, the term of these loans is often a very short 36 months. This means the payment will be very high. If you lose your job or encounter financial difficulties, this increases the chance that the car will be repossessed.

One of the most botched personal-finance decision’s people make is the unnecessary purchase of a new car. Because a new car depreciates by 20-30% as soon as it leaves the dealer, it is one of the worst investments you can make with your money. Consider buying a barely used version of the same model, and you can reduce your costs considerably without compromising the reliability of your car.

Following the above advice is going to get you on the road to budgeting, not the road to riches. You need to live within your means to protect your credit rating and be able to begin saving for the future or the luxury items you wish to have. Set financial goals and stick to them.